2010 Notes
05/10/2010

As a time of renewal, spring prompts us to clean house and make busy all the projects that winter stunted.  I have been organizing my studio the last few weeks, not just in service of that cathartic spring clean, but to prepare for the Elephant’s Eye Bucks County Studio tour, in which I will be participating for the second year.
Regarding the arrangement of my studio space, I often think of the eccentric New York short-order chef who described his kitchen as a series of creative solutions to the problems that arise over time.  Building a creative space is a communication back and forth between a person and their surroundings leading to a design adapted to one’s personal habits.  Read more…

02/08/2010

It’s likely that recently deceased author, J.D. Salinger will be remembered as much if not more for his noted reclusion than for his written works.  Shying away from the attention his writing earned, Salinger adopted a secluded life in rural New Hampshire that lasted over fifty years.  It’s ironic that reclusion from attention should bring about attention to reclusion, but such a retreat creates a nagging mystery that only grows more intriguing with silence.
The acts of writing and painting share a similar solitude.  They are private acts that pass on to a public audience.  Read more…

06/07/2010

The realm of design is so vast and philosophies for what makes good design are as varied as tastes in art.  By and large the majority of design that we experience is in a supporting role.  The task of the thing that is designed is not changed by the design, but it is qualified by it.  A chair is for sitting, but it can be comfortable or uncomfortable, handsome or ugly.   While a chair is defined largely by its function as a sitting device, it needs to have a core “chair DNA” to be recognized as such, and not confused for a couch, a stool or a horse.  Read more…

04/05/2010

Several years ago I endeavored at the side of some dear friends to make 120 feet of pork sausage.  It would take a bit too much exposition to describe the event for which this sausage was necessary, but suffice it to say it involved delusions of grandeur and a gathering of 120 individuals expecting to be fed the next day.  The leader of this operation was a geologist with equal expertise as a chef and a commanding vision for food.  The rest of us carried out the roles of meat trimmer, meat grinder, spice measurer and casing manager under his guidance.  Together, we were a fine-working machine with meat dancing between us, transforming into fine Italian sausage. Read more…

03/08/2010

Geography is a strange business for visualization.  Maps have historically been drawn through exploration and conquest, compounded with superstition and supposition and only recently calibrated by modern technology.  Even with a democracy of satellite precision, most of us carry around the idea of a map, observed from above, holding Europe and the United States in the center of our gaze.  While it is important to have a common agreement on the layout of our globe, it is just a metaphor.  Our actual experience isn’t quite defined by maps and globes.  It’s interesting to keep track of where our mental maps wander away from cartography. Read more…

08/07/2010

As I gain familiarity with available pigments, mediums and tools, I hone in on a family of materials that I consistently replenish.  More often than not I purchase my oil paint from online art supply merchants these days.  I go to Dick Blick’s or Utrecht’s online store and order my supplies with the presumption that their quality will be the same as that which I’ve already used.  The supplies arrive, neatly packaged at my doorstep within a few days.  It is an efficient and predictable process towards which I’ve grown quickly complacent.  Read more…